140,000

Our goal to find 140,000 environmental love songs that inspire ecological actions, help save our planet earth and stop climate change. Fans and musicians worldwide are invited to help us get those environmental love songs written, recorded and on the charts.

Put on the XOEarth

Fans can help by sponsoring us to write an environmental song about an issue of their choice or sponsor a song we are working on. If you sponsor one of Stele's (my) songs, you will get a copyright co-ownership certificate in your or a friend's name.

Songwriters are invited to add their songs to the Open Mic or any other post. Open Mic environmental songs will be entered in EcoLotto's $4444 lottery.

140,000 was chosen as it is the approximate number of endangered species that may be in danger of extinction.

If you have an event coming up, hire Stele (me) to do his XOEarth Man music and magic show.

Some of Stele's songs are at soundclick.com/greentopia.

Guitar lessons, songwriting and music theory are related services that Stele offers. Most beginners can play a song after one lesson.

Stele (me again) is also a massage therapist specializing in neuromuscular, deep tissue and meditative massage in S Boulder. BodyMindWorks.net.

For all the life, Stele Ely.
Mail: steleely(et)yah()o(dat)com
Home: XOEarth.org / 140,000 Love Songs for the Planet
Big Home: Greentopia.org
Donate: Via PayPal
Call: 72O.34O.8O8O   Google+

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Musicians, help us write and record four anti-nuke songs.
I think these songs are super crucial to encourage a shift to energy conservation and renewables!
If you write and send me a cool anti-nuke song or a link to it, I will enter you our little EcoLotto for a chance to win up to $4444.

For the life, Stele Ely

http://voxerth.net/2010/01/ecolotto/

grist puns: the nukes of hazard , electricity too lethal to meter

Excerpt from: *The Japan Syndrome* by Carl Pope

My friend who had started his career at Brown’s Ferry closed his second email to me saying that he hoped he was wrong. He wasn’t, and his email shows why we shouldn’t listen to experts who tell us “it can’t happen here.” My friend pointed out that “total loss of AC power, which they had, coupled with an earthquake and a tsunami is not a design basis that many plant owners or operators contemplate.” He’s right. That’s the problem with nuclear technology. There are too many “worst-case” scenarios to include them all in a design basis or an operating plan. How many different forms could a terrorist attack take? And how many of those are adequately taken into account in the design of nuclear reactors? (Answer: very few.)

The problem with building nuclear power plants is not that they are likely to have an accident — they aren’t. In that sense, they’re relatively safe. But the magnitude and consequences of even a single such accident are simply too large to warrant even a small risk. Several hundred miles of Japan’s coastline were totally devastated by the tsunami. But the big worry facing the country, and the world, today is confined to two tiny sections of that devastation — the nuclear power plants.

huffingtonpost.com/carl-pope/the-japan-syndrome_b_835690.html

sierraclub.typepad.com/carlpope/2011/03/the-japan-syndrome.html

Via Washington Post and Greenpeace:

www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/if-the-japanese-cant-build-a-safe-reactor-who-can/2011/03/14/ABCJvuV_story.html?hpid=z7

www.greenpeace.org/usa/en/news-and-blogs/campaign-blog/washington-post-article-calling-for-an-end-to/blog/33752

If the japanese can’t make nuclear safe, how can the rest of the world?

EcoLotto:
http://voxerth.net/2010/01/ecolotto

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