The Lionfish Roars


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Does the Lionfish needs its own song? Maybe *The Lionfish Roars*, a tune about a lionfish calling out loud and clear for us to save its home so it can have its little invasive species family. It is an invasive species – just like we humans are – but no worries if we wipe out the reefs entirely. So how about a song calling on everyone to help protect their coral reef so they – and the human race – can be more of a worry than total extinction. So let’s buy way, way, way less stuff that is killing the reefs and to keep these beautiful mean buggers alive. Help me write the song or sponsor me to write it.

For all the oceans, for all the life, Stele

PS: The Zebra turkeyfish or Zebra lionfish.

Via: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dendrochirus_zebra
The Zebra turkeyfish or Zebra lionfish, Dendrochirus zebra, is a carnivorous ray-finned fish with venomous spines that lives in the Indian and western Pacific oceans. However, lionfishes have been found in the Atlantic Ocean as well, up to the coast of New York. This range is most likely a result of aquarists releasing their pets into the wild. This member of the scorpion fish family has thirteen venomous spines along its back, used to defend itself. These spines are connected with a clear film. These fish are slow-moving and peaceful, but can be dangerous. They have a habit of resting in places hidden from light such as under a rock or a piece of coral. All lionfish are immune to each other’s poison and all are solitary fish. Zebra lionfish are found at depths down to only 60 meters. Despite their obvious advantage, zebra lionfish feed only on small crustaceans, and are in turn preyed upon by groupers.

Via: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ray-finned_fish
The Actinopterygii ( /ˌæktɨnɒptəˈrɪdʒi.aɪ/), or ray-finned fishes, constitute a class or subclass of the bony fishes.
The ray-finned fishes are so called because they possess lepidotrichia or “fin rays”, their fins being webs of skin supported by bony or horny spines (“rays”), as opposed to the fleshy, lobed fins that characterize the class Sarcopterygii which also, however, possess lepidotrichia. These actinopterygian fin rays attach directly to the proximal or basal skeletal elements, the radials, which represent the link or connection between these fins and the internal skeleton (e.g., pelvic and pectoral girdles).

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Consider donating a dollar or more to support this song and to keep Stele writing environmental songs. Your tips will help get this song properly recorded and performed by musicians who can get this song working for our biosphere.




Please pass this song around to friends and favorite musicians.

Musicians:: Arrange, record and remix a better version of this song. I may be able to share the copyright for your work.
Perform this song at your gigs to help our planet.
Fans:: Sponsor this song and get partial copyright — $44 can get you a copyright certificate showing your percentage of the copyright (the percentage varies depending on the song). By the way, $44 pays for a day of Stele’s life expenses including rent, food, guitar strings and other vitals). Plus, I will keep improving the song.
Artists:: Help us do a video for YouTube or do other multimedia goodies for the song.
Students:: Intern with Stele and help get this and other songs on the charts.

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