Love On The ClothesLine [and Clothes Rack] : Passionate Eco Laundry Drying All Year Long


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baby likes fresh air and periwinkle skies
so I dry them knickers and skirts on a clothesline
baby smiles on laundry day, mighty fine
so I put my love on the line

it takes several power plants to dry America's clothes,
polluting air, land, water close to our homes
clothes dryer monsters electric and gas
they're a pain in the planet's biomass

baby likes pleased trees and turquoise hills
so I dry our socks and undies on the windowsill
baby hugs on laundry day, mighty fine
so I put my love on the twine

even in the cold and rain, it's fun to hang outside
our threads last longer and stay cuddly nice
then on really rainy days, we do it inside
on hangers, chairs, drying racks, for all the life

baby likes sweet streams and oceans sublime
so I dry our sheets and hankies on a clothesline
baby kisses on laundry day, mighty fine
so I put my love on the line

On The Clothesline / stele cc

~~~~

About 1.5 square meters of habitat potential is saved every time a clothesline is used instead of a gas or electric clothes dryer. This does not include the loss of habitat due to the climate change impact of using the gas or electric clothes dryer. [XOEarth.org/ecofx-clothes-dryer]

US clothes dryers use around 1,000 kilowatt hours of electricity a year per household. That's close to 4% of the 11,000 kilowatt hours of electricity used per year by most households. Therefore, if we all start using clotheslines, it will be like turning off about 4% of the power plants that are needed to produce energy for US households.

Since U.S. homes use about 20% of the energy generated by electric power plants, it would reduce the pollution put out by all of the U.S. power plants by ~1%. [www.eia.gov]

Plus, this does not include the additional impact of homes that use natural gas dryers!

More info about clothelines is at:
The environmental impact of a clothes dryer and a clothes line [ecofx]
Wikipedia
Clotheslines Stage a Comeback [NY Times]

~~~~

Hello XOEarth Friends,
Come do the Clothesline dance and singalong with Stele *XOEarth Man* on the mall in Boulder twice a month. It's a little celebration of the clothesline's power to protect our air, water and land.

Bring some clothes to hang - and clothespins if you have some. We will supply the clothesline and some clothespins.

I would like to write a special clothesline dance song too. Who wants to help with this one?
For all the life, Stele Ely

~~~~

chords:
.baby likes fresh air and periwinkle .skies /d em
so I .dry them knickers and skirts on a .clothesline /g d
(my/yea) .baby smiles on laundry day, mighty .fine /d em
cuz I .put my love. on the .line /g a d

it takes several .power plants to dry america's .clothes, /c am d
.polluting .air, land, water .close to our .homes /em a g a
.clothes dryer .monsters .electric and .gas /em a em a
.they're a pain in the. .planet's biomass /em a g d

.baby likes pleased trees and turquoise hills /d em
so I .dry our socks and undies on the .windowsill / g d
.baby hugs on laundry day, mighty .fine /d em
cuz I .put my love. on the .twine /g a d

.even in the .cold and rain, it's fun to hang out.side /c am d
our threads last .longer .and stay cuddly .nice /em a g a
.then on really rainy .days, .we do it in.side /em a em a
.on hangers, .chairs, drying racks, for .all the .life /em a g d

.baby likes sweet streams and oceans sub.lime /d em
so I .dry our sheets and hankies on a .clothesline /g d
.baby kisses on laundry day, mighty .fine /d em
cuz I .put my .love on the .line /g a d

~~~~

Thanks to Greg Miller and Valerie Stuart for help on this song.

~~~~

These thread monsters are hurting the planet, ruining our clothes, costing us to much money and adding to inside air pollution. That monster is a clothes dryer, of course.

Going to put my love on the line
Going to hang my clothes out to dry
Cuz I love my baby so fine
cuz she loves a clean blue sky ~stele 10

Letting It All Hang Out : The Clothesline Wars by Ronnie Citron-Fink

It seems like one of the simplest of household tasks – hanging out the laundry to dry. But this simple task has received quite a bit of controversy. The politics of laundry drying is the subject of a recent New York Times article that chronicles a woman’s struggle to put her laundry out to dry.

After learning about the threat of global warming, Jill Saylor decided to hang her clothes outside on a line behind her mobile home to save some energy. “I figured trailer parks were the one place left where hanging your laundry was actually still allowed,” Saylor told New York Times reporter Ian Urbina. But, she was wrong. Apparently, many people in her trailer park view clothes drying outside as an “eyesore,” so she was forbidden from doing so. According to the New York Times article, what happened to Saylor is not uncommon. In fact, 60 million people living in 300,000 private communities in the U.S. are banned from drying their clothes outside.

However, the laws are changing with implications that are cultural, political, economic and environmental. What’s behind the controversial clothesline wars?

• Proponents believe they should not be prohibited by their neighbors or local community agreements from saving on energy bills or acting in an environmentally-minded way.
• Opponents say the laws lifting bans on outside clothesline drying erode local property rights and undermine the autonomy of private communities.

Clothes dryers use at least six percent of all household electricity consumption and 10-15 percent of domestic energy in the U.S. The environmental impact of using the clothes dryer less could easily help each of us do our part for the planet.

10 reasons to hang dry laundry:
1. Save money.
2. Clothes last longer.
3. Clothes and linens smell better.
4. It conserves energy and environmental resources.
5. Hanging laundry is a moderate physical activity that can be done outside.
6. Sunlight bleaches and disinfects.
7. Indoor racks can humidify in dry and cold climates.
8. It is safer. Clothes dryer fires account for about 17,700 fires, 15 deaths and 360 injuries annually.
9. It is a fun outdoor experience that can be meditative and community-building.
10. Small steps make a difference.

The cultural and community-building component to laundry drying became evident to me a few years ago when I spent some time in Spain. The fourth floor apartment had a laundry line attached to a windowsill that connected to a neighbor’s window. Looking out the laundry window, as we affectionately called it, all the building occupant’s communal laundry lines crisscrossed up and down the center alley of the building. Everything from towels to underwear to sneakers went on the line to dry. Every few days I would lean out the window, retrieve my line and smile and wave to the other apartment dwellers as we put our laundry out to dry together. There seemed to be no class distinctions, rich and poor hung their laundry up to dry.

Maybe thinking about home building differently can nudge us closer to using the dryer less. Richard Seireeni, a Huffington Post writer suggests adding a “dry room” to homebuilders’ plans: “a place where the furnace, water heater (or tankless water heater) and washer/dryer could live together along with built-in lines or racks for drying [where] all that excess heat that is normally vented and wasted could be used to dry the family laundry, particularly in the winter when outdoor line drying is not always possible.” Seireeni’s idea is simple, efficient, and could save a homeowner a lot of money.

However, if you’re stuck in a house without a “dry room,” and don’t have the means to line dry your clothes outside, especially as the air gets cooler for those of us on the northern hemisphere, here are some tips to lighten your dryer’s energy load.

So, what happened to Ms. Saylor, from the mobile home park? “Pressure makes a difference,” she told NY Times. A petition was delivered to the property owner, who recently complied with Saylor, and victory was hers.

What do you think? Should drying laundry au natural be a cultural, political, economic or environmental clash? Do you believe that sheets dancing in the wind are beautiful because they help heal the environment, or do you want to look outside your window and see nature, not laundry?

And while you’re at it, check out the trailer for Drying For Freedom, a documentary that follows the movement to lift the bans on clothes lines. [www.youtube.com/watch?v=7gm2ZL1CVWU]
~~~~

H Is For Hang Dry by Ronnie Citron-Fink

Dryers use 10 to 15% of domestic energy in the United States!

"We must all hang together, or most assuredly we will all hang separately." - Benjamin Franklin

Without measurement there is no improvement. ~ Lord Kelvin

TOP TEN REASONS TO HANG OUT
Dryers use 10 to 15% of domestic energy in the United States!
(Learn more...)
10) Save money (more than $25/month off electric bill for many households). FN1
9) Clothes last longer. Where do you think lint comes from?FN2
8) Clothes and linens smell better without adding possibly toxic chemicals to your body and the environment. FN3
7) Conserve energy and the environment, while reducing climate change. FN4
6) It is moderate physical activity which you can do in or outside. FN5
5) Sunlight bleaches and disinfects. FN6
4) Indoor racks can humidify in dry winter weather. FN7
3) Clothes dryer and washing machine fires account for about 17,700 structure fires, 15 deaths, and 360 injuries annually. The yearly national fire loss for clothes dryer fires in structures is estimated at $194 million. FN8
2) It is fun! And can be an outdoor experience that is meditative and community-building. FN9
1) Demonstrates that small steps can make a difference. Don't have to wait for the government to take action! FN10

"My #1 reason for hanging clothes: time management. When I dry clothes in the dryer (which I must do in Illinois in the winter) I need to be there when the dryer stops or everything comes out wrinkled, so I can't walk away except for short periods. When I line dry, I can walk away - go shopping, have fun, garden, whatever - and the clothes will be fine no matter how long they hang on the line after they're dry." ~ Marti Jernberg, Elgin, IL

"People here operate AC in their houses almost year round, because it's so friggin' hot. A clothes dryer just heats the house up more, so the AC has to work harder to cool the house down, thus wasting even more energy than your estimates for colder parts of the country." Linda DuPriest, Friggin' Texas

Principles
• It is not enough to define a problem and offer no solutions.
• Our consumption patterns create the demand for electricity.
• The generation of nuclear power is an inefficient energy source producing an abundance of hazardous waste of which we cannot safely dispose.
• Raising awareness of existing alternatives to nuclear power and large hydroelectric projects will help people and corporations to make appropriate technological choices.
• Nobody should have to live, work, or play near a nuclear facility.
• No culture or community should be destroyed by a hydroelectric facility or any other monolithic corporate project.
• The sun is the most powerful nuclear reactor and can serve many purposes—none of which should be ignored.
• All citizens nation-wide should have the legal right to hang out their laundry.
• Frugality, or thrift, needs to be a universally practiced virtue.

~~~~

Fire Your Dryer by Melissa Breyer

Get a clothesline or rack to dry your clothes by the air. Your wardrobe will maintain color and fit, and you’ll save money. Read about the virtues of hanging your clothes out to dry.

Okay, so maybe I gravitate toward “Granny-sense” a bit more than your average gal in New York City–I get my milk in glass bottles (although from the farmer’s market, not from a white-capped milkman, but if I could…), I’ve been known to make my own butter, and little makes me happier than putting up some summer fruit. I know I’m not the only person in the city to lean towards simplicity–I think part of it is a tinge of rebellion about living in this huge metropolis. Even though I choose to live here, I can’t deny the part of me who desperately wants laying hens and a long walk to the mailbox. And that’s the part of me who thinks that line-dried laundry might be just about the loveliest thing ever.

I’m not sure which comes first. Does our desire for simplicity lead us to green living, or does green living lead us to simplicity? Either way, what could epitomize both concepts better than a clothesline with fresh, fluttering, air-dried linens? Now, yes, in this vision I am picturing there is ample grass underfoot, the smell of wildflowers in the air, and rolling hills in the vista. But still, there is something undeniably urban-romantic about the Brooklyn old-timers who always have a load of laundry drying on a clothesline stretched from their window to a pulley on a neighboring phone pole. I have come to love the creak-creak-creak squeaks that each tug of the line elicits as some granny is pulling her clothes home.

Now add to the romance a few important considerations. In many homes, the clothes dryer is the third most energy-consuming appliance–and I think we all know that by cutting back on our energy use we are helping to reduce our dependence on dirty coal-fired power plants.

And there are some great side affects to air-drying, Green America points out the benefits and offers some great tips:

• The dryer shortens the life of your clothing by over-drying items and thinning them out. So firing your dryer is also a great strategy for conserving your favorite clothes longer and saving the cost of replacing them before their time.
• Anyone who’s had to wait around the laundromat or delay an errand to fold clothes right when the dryer finished will appreciate the flexibility of air-drying clothes. While it may take longer for clothing to get dry–from a few hours to about a day–you don’t have to be present to fold them to prevent wrinkles or leave a shared dryer for someone else. You can hang your laundry on the rack or line and go about your day, then come back to fold whenever you get around to it.
• Another perk to “firing” your dryer is that it eliminates the risk that your dryer could ever start a dangerous fire. According to a report by FEMA, clothes dryer vents can become clogged with lint, causing more than 15,000 house fires every year.
• A clothesline enables you to spend some of your laundry time enjoying the outdoors, your clothes smell “sunny” when they come back in, and drying in the sunshine helps to naturally disinfect clothes, and to gently bleach whites.
• You can purchase a variety of racks and lines for outdoor air-drying of clothes. Some fold out into a rotary umbrella shape; others stretch multiple lines between two “T” posts. Gaiam’s Real Goods offers a $20 retractable clothesline that can mount to a post or the side of a house. The innovative Cord-O Clip is a time-saving clothesline with built-in clips that close automatically when people place clothes on the line and push, and open automatically as the line is pulled around once the clothes are dry.
• If you have pollen allergies, don’t have an outdoor space for hanging up clothes to dry, or expect the weather in your area will be too rainy or cold for a successful outdoor clothesline, forego the outdoor approach and use an indoor drying rack instead, of which there a wide variety of available.
• Large items like sheets and towels can dry draped over a door, banister, or a shower rod; and tablecloths generally dry happily right on the tables they cover (use your best judgement as to whether a damp tablecloth will affect the finish on your table or not). Socks and other smaller items can air-dry using hangers lined with clips.
• Nancy Hoffmann in New York City has been drying her clothes indoors in her apartment for years. To speed up the process, she turns a floor fan on a low setting facing her drying racks. She reports that “most of my clothes dry in a couple hours, max” with much less electricity use than a dryer would require.
• Drying clothing indoors can also have an added perk when it helps to keep indoor winter air moist, a kind of low-tech humidifier.

I would love to hear from you whether or not you have ditched your dryer. What benefits have you found? And will you share your tips in the comments below?

A clothesline can dry clothes in humid climates, in the winter and even on snowy days.

Songwriters, add your clothesline song in a comment below. Songwriters posting their clothesline song will get the chance to win up to $4,444 and a framed XOEarth Award with the polar bear.

More:
grist.org/article/2009-11-12-alex-lee-clothesline-revolution
www.treehugger.com/sustainable-product-design/clotheslines-for-sale-plethora-of-drying-options-online.html
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clothes_line
https://www.treehugger.com/culture/care-to-air-design-challenge-by-levis.html

~~~~

Artists:: A vid, art or dance for this song would be nice.
Musicians:: Tweak and record your version and we will promote it here.
Fans:: Share and sponsor this song.

Donate to support a better version and recording of this song. $44 or more gets you a partial copyright of this song and certificate.

 

 


If you love somebody, put your love on the line.

 

ClotheslineIllo

 

NakedTwoClothesLineCouplesTush

 

 

 

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Stele

About Stele

Earth Lovers, Write enviro songs, make art and media with me to inspire peeps to join us in taking eco actions that help save our imperiled Earth and slow down the climate change monsters. Peas, love and flaxseed butter, Stele

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21 thoughts on “Love On The ClothesLine [and Clothes Rack] : Passionate Eco Laundry Drying All Year Long

  • Stele
    Stele Post author

    "Living in New York City, one becomes accustomed to the grey area between public and private space. Intimate details are exposed through the most mundane daily tasks. Laundry is one of those inevitable rituals that most New Yorkers have to perform in public. Before laundromats, the clothesline was an intrinsic component of the urban landscape. It is impossible to imagine the archetypal tenement building complete without several strands of white linen connecting each structure."
    https://blog.mcny.org/2012/08/07/a-fine-line-the-art-of-the-clothesline/

  • Stel
    Stel Post author

    Via Greg in Boulder: I opted for no dryer at all. They're energy hogs. My drying racks/clothesline have performed perfectly with no problems nor energy usage for 14 years now. Clothes won't wash themselves but they will dry themselves... especially in this climate. They also put humidity in the house in the winter and on my deck in the summer how cool to have your clothes dry by the Sun... Starlight!!! Certain "conveniences" like dryers and garbage disposals (compost instead) we can do without.

  • SteleEly
    SteleEly Post author

    Via Harry Albert:: Small heaters generally have a fan-only (no heat) setting, which I find greener and quite helpful for stirring moist air away from clothes hanging indoors. The fan uses far less energy than the heater function does.
    And because my shower area has its windows shut for winter (covered with bubble wrap) I find it useful, after using the shower, to run the little heater on fan-only in that room to dry out the shower stall and hanging towel so at to avoid mildew/mold.. a few hours suffices.
    Recipe for stowable indoor clothesline: two small screw-eyes. Two small ess-hooks (shaped like letter S.) A length of kite string (Into the Wind has nice dacron, which is PET). Optionally squeeze one end of each S into a closed loop. Install the screw eyes in wooden trim (they would pull out of drywall).. driving in a nail then pulling it out will make a starter hole for a screw eye. Tie the string to the closed-loops of the ess hooks so that the open ends of the hooks can clip into the screw eyes and hold the string tight. When not in use, clothes line can be unhooked at one end and that ess hung on the other eye, or unhooked at both ends and stowed elsewhere.

    Harry also recommends this read:
    Hanging Out Day: ...Project Laundry List’s efforts on April 19th to educate communities about energy consumption, “Right to Dry” legislation, and most importantly, how to save money and energy by utilizing a clothesline.
    Hanging Out Day is [a day] that individuals hang their clothes on a clothesline, with messages on sheets or T-shirts so that everyone will see them, and discuss your statement.
    https://www.govloop.com/community/blog/hanging-ou...

  • Avatar
    Bonnie

    We've started a Love on the Line campaign in Boulder for Earth Month 2016 ....to spread by each of us turning someone onto hanging their clothes out!. Our C3 Culture Climate Collaboration meeting with you, me and a group of inspired people got it going. Anyone can join the campaign and share ideas ... like posting hanging clothes photos on Facebook, in Laundromats, etc.

  • SteleEly
    SteleEly Post author

    Treehugger excerpt: Hanging laundry has many benefits. You don’t have to use the dryer, which saves significantly on electricity. It keeps clothes in much better condition. Think about the lint trap; that’s really just bits of your clothing, which weaken with every drying session. Better to treat them kindly by hanging to dry. They will last longer.

    MoreHang-drying is fast, too. When I hang clothes on a summer morning, they dry by mid-afternoon. In the winter, I hang them in the evening on a rack inside the house, and they are dry by morning; they also help humidify the air in the room. ... http://www.treehugger.com/cleaning-organizing/how...

  • SteleEly
    SteleEly Post author

    My super Mom sent me this::
    Clothesline News Forecast / by Charlie Walker in Welcome To My World Of Proper Poetryhttp://www.lulu.com/spotlight/cwys07307
    To neighbors passing by,
    There were no secrets you could keep, When clothes were hung to
    dry.
    It also was a friendly link, For neighbors always knew
    If company had stopped on by, to spend a night or two.
    For then you'd see the "fancy sheets", And towels upon the
    line;
    You'd see the "company table cloths", With intricate designs.
    The line announced a baby's birth, From folks who lived
    inside,
    As brand new infant clothes were hung, So carefully with
    pride!
    The ages of the children could, So readily be known
    By watching how the sizes changed, You'd know how much they'd
    grown!
    It also told when illness struck, As extra sheets were hung;
    Then nightclothes, and a bathrobe too, Haphazardly were strung.
    It also said, "On vacation now", When lines hung limp and
    bare.
    It told, "We're back!" when full lines sagged, With not an inch to
    spare!
    New folks in town were scorned upon, If wash was dingy and
    gray,
    As neighbors carefully raised their brows, And looked the other
    way.
    But clotheslines now are of the past, For dryers make work much
    less.
    Now what goes on inside a home, Is anybody's guess!
    I really miss that way of life, It was a friendly sign
    When neighbors knew each other best... By what hung on the
    line.

  • Avatar
    mama kummerle

    I have been drying my clothes on the line and inside draped on anything since my two kids were babies using cloth diapers, two in diapers at a time, and then while caring for my incontinent mother. It is a great way to center in on one thing over time that can be done to help the planet. Plant some beautiful plants and flowers by your line. I have observed many birds including a beautiful underlit glance of an owl flying to my neighbors roof, it is a wonderful way to escape the hectic house for a good reason, has kept me sane. TRY THIS, PIN ONE TO THREE CLOTHES PINS ON YOUR HAT OR CLOTHES ANY TIME YOU GO SOMEWHERE, IF ANY ONE ASKS WHY, YOU HAVE A CHANCE TO HANG SOME CLOTHES LINE LOVE...TO PLANT THE SEEDS OF CHANGE, WHO KNOWS YOU MY START ONE PERSON HANGING THEIR CLOTHES OVER A LIFETIME. thanks, mama kummerle

  • SteleEly
    SteleEly Post author

    Alexander Lee founded Project Laundry List as a Middlebury College undergrad in 1995, after hearing Dr. Helen Caldicott say we could shut down the nuclear industry if we all did things like hang out our clothes. He’s been true to the cause ever since, pushing for clotheslines across the land — even at the White House. Grist caught up with him to find out how hanging out can make for better neighborhoods, what clotheslines have to do with climate change, and why laundry stigmas are as persistent as wine stains.
    http://grist.org/article/2009-11-12-alex-lee-clot...

  • SteleEly
    SteleEly Post author

    Via *Project Laundry List*
    10) Save money :: You can save more than $25/month off the monthly electric bill for many households.
    9) Clothes last longer :: Where do you think lint comes from?
    8) Pleasant Scent :: Clothes and linens smell better without adding possibly toxic chemicals to your body and the environment. Yankee Candle thinks so, too...
    7) Saves Energy, Preserves Environment, Reduces Pollution :: Conserve energy and the environment, while reducing climate change. Learn how!
    6) Healthy Work :: It is moderate physical activity which you can do in or outside. You can even lose weight!
    5) Get the Sunshine Treatment :: Sunlight bleaches and disinfects.
    4) Replace another appliance :: Indoor racks can humidify in dry winter weather.
    3) Avoid a Fire :: Clothes dryer and washing machine fires account for about 17,700 structure fires, 15 deaths, and 360 injuries annually. The yearly national fire loss for clothes dryer fires in structures is estimated at $194 million. See a diagram of the critical danger zones of the dryer.
    2) It is fun! :: And can be an outdoor experience that is meditative and community-building. It may also help you avoid depression.
    1) It is truly patriotic :: Demonstrates that small steps can make a difference. You don't have to wait for the government to take action!

  • SteleEly
    SteleEly Post author

    Via Tony (Mr. Energy) Mitchell via conservect .org ... Knowing that any appliance that heats something with electrical resistance (dishwasher, water heater, oven, toaster etc) is inherently inefficient, I did a few calculations for the dryer. I recorded the electric meter readings before and after using the dryer, adding the kWh used from the street to the kWh produced from the solar panels making sure everything else in the house was off or that I could account for it. 3 kWh for a 40 minutes dryer load, or 4.5 kWh per hour of use. $0.69 of Clean Energy Option electricity per load. In my house, thats $251.85 a year. If we did not get our power from renewable solar or wind from our own panels or from Community Energy or Sterling Planet, we'd pump a couple tons of greenhouse gasses into the air from the power plants just drying clothes.

  • SteleEly
    SteleEly Post author

    excerpt via Grist http://grist.org/living/ask-umbra-are-clothesline...
    People are complaining about clotheslines in Brooklyn? What’s next, lamenting that there are too many cowboy hats in Dallas, or too many cows in Vermont? I know Brooklyn has experienced some serious gentrification in recent years, but it strikes me as a wee bit unrealistic for your boyfriend’s tenants to think life in Bensonhurst or any other urban neighborhood would be uncluttered by other people’s realities — and yes, that includes their underwear.

    As far as I can tell, and as decades of photographs seem to indicate (including those collected for an exhibit celebrating the role of clotheslines in the city), these items are such a part of life in New York that no one has ever thought to regulate them. Just to be sure, I did some digging on your behalf.

    We should consider clotheslines just one of the many things our forebears did right. Why? For starters, your clothes last longer if you air dry them instead of using a dryer. Clotheslines also save money and energy: Dryers are among our most energy-sucking household appliances, second only to the refrigerator. Line-drying can save an estimated $25 a month off your electric bill, says Project Laundry List, which offers a load of other reasons to hang your laundry out to dry.

    Yet there are still plenty of places where clotheslines are banned. And your boyfriend’s building could probably be among them, if he wanted to play the heavy: New York is not one of the 20 or so states that legally protect the “right to dry,” which means landlords and community associations can, to some extent, make their own rules. The housing official I consulted also said anything that blocks fire escapes or emergency exits can be considered a concern.

  • SteleEly
    SteleEly Post author

    Via 'A Fine Line: The Art of the Clothesline' article with some great clothesline pics. : Living in New York City, one becomes accustomed to the grey area between public and private space. Intimate details are exposed through the most mundane daily tasks. Laundry is one of those inevitable rituals that most New Yorkers have to perform in public. Before laundromats, the clothesline was an intrinsic component of the urban landscape. It is impossible to imagine the archetypal tenement building complete without several strands of white linen connecting each structure. http://mcnyblog.org/2012/08/07/a-fine-line-the-ar...

  • SteleEly
    SteleEly Post author

    'Love On The Line' version without chords and period cues:

    baby likes fresh air and periwinkle skies
    so I dry them knickers and skirts on a clothesline
    (my/yea) baby smiles on laundry day, mighty fine
    cuz I hang my love on the line

    it takes several power plants to dry america’s clothes,
    polluting air, land, water close to our homes
    clothes dryer monsters electric and gas
    they’re a pain in the planet’s biomass

    baby likes pleased trees and turquoise hills
    so I dry our socks and undies on the windowsill
    baby hugs on laundry day, mighty fine
    cuz I put my love on the twine

    even in the cold and snow, it’s fun to hang outside
    our threads last longer and stay cuddly nice
    then on rainy days, we do it inside
    on hangers, chairs, drying racks, for all the life

    baby likes sweet streams and oceans sublime
    so I dry our sheets and hankies on a clothesline
    baby kisses on laundry day, mighty fine
    cuz I hang our love on the line

  • SteleEly
    SteleEly Post author

    I am not advocating gas or electric clothes dryers by this comment.
    However, I found a little on the web about using a clothes dryer without heat -- which might be more ecological. One woman did note that "One of our comforters specifies air dry only. Being very light and cloud-like, it does actually dry pretty quickly without heat." Another person said regarding the "Air Dry Function on Dryer", that "Takes a while, but it will [dry clothing]. Similar in time to simply setting the item out on a rack, but there is forced airflow through the dryer."
    So, I think the effectiveness of using a clothes dryer without heat depends on the relative humidity of the ambient air. So on dryer days it should work better.